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Information Literacy  

Are you Information Literate? Tips and Tutorials.
Last Updated: Jul 28, 2016 URL: http://libguides.laroche.edu/content.php?pid=658378 Print Guide RSS UpdatesEmail Alerts
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Information Literacy Tutorials and Help

We have entered the Information Age and are inundated daily with data from many sources in a variety of forms.

Each year the number of books and journals published increases. In 1992, 49,276 books were published in the United States alone. A daily edition of The New York Times includes more information than the average person in the 18th century would come across in a lifetime. People can watch television 24 hours a day on more than 1,064 stations. Thousands of radio stations broadcast nonstop world wide and modern communication technology allows immediate news everywhere. Electronic publishing assaults computer users with a never ending array of information.

 Source: Delta College Library

 Delta college-Evaluating Information

 TIPS- Information Literacy FAQ and Quiz

More Help to assist you in understanding Information Literacy

 

Information Literacy

"Information literacy is an intellectual framework for understanding, finding, evaluating, and using information--activities which may be accomplished in part by fluency with information technology, in part by sound investigative methods, but most important, through critical discernment and reasoning."


Source: "Information Literacy Standards for Student Learning," of Information Power: Building Partnerships for Learning.

In other words:

Information literacy’s focus is on content, communication, analysis, information searching, and evaluation.  The focus is on not only being able to obtain the information, but being able to evaluate and use the information correctly.

 

Information literacy- What is it & Why is it important?

  Information Literacy :  What is it?

            Information literacy is a set of abilities requiring individuals to "recognize when information is needed and have the ability to locate, evaluate, and use  effectively the needed information. - - ALA

Information Literacy versus Information Technology

Information literacy is related to information technology skills, but has broader implications for the individual, the educational system, and for society. Information technology skills enable an individual to use computers, software applications, databases, and other technologies to achieve a wide variety of academic, work-related, and personal goals. Information literate individuals necessarily develop some technology skills.

Information literacy, while showing significant overlap with information technology skills, is a distinct and broader area of competence. Increasingly, information technology skills are interwoven with, and support, information literacy. "Fluency" with information technology may require more intellectual abilities than the rote learning of software and hardware associated with "computer literacy", but the focus is still on the technology itself.

 Information literacy, on the other hand, is an intellectual framework for understanding, finding, evaluating, and using information--activities which may be accomplished in part by fluency with information technology, in part by sound investigative methods, but most important, through critical discernment and reasoning. Information literacy initiates, sustains, and extends lifelong learning through abilities which may use technologies but are ultimately independent of them.

 Source: "Information Literacy Standards for Student Learning," of Information Power: Building Partnerships for Learning

 

Information Literacy: Why is it Important? 

 Because of the escalating complexity of this environment, individuals are faced with diverse, abundant information choices--in their academic studies, in the workplace, and in their personal lives. Information is available through libraries, community resources, special interest organizations, media, and the Internet--and increasingly, information comes to individuals in unfiltered formats, raising questions about its authenticity, validity, and reliability. In addition, information is available through multiple media, including graphical, aural, and textual, and these pose new challenges for individuals in evaluating and understanding it. The uncertain quality and expanding quantity of information pose large challenges for society. The sheer abundance of information will not in itself create a more informed citizenry without a complementary cluster of abilities necessary to use information effectively.

Information literacy forms the basis for lifelong learning. It is common to all disciplines, to all learning environments, and to all levels of education. It enables learners to master content and extend their investigations, become more self-directed, and assume greater control over their own learning. An information literate individual is able to:

 

  • Determine the extent of information needed
  • Access the needed information effectively and efficiently
  • Evaluate information and its sources critically
  • Incorporate selected information into one’s knowledge base
  • Use information effectively to accomplish a specific purpose
  • Understand the economic, legal, and social issues surrounding the use of information, and access and use information ethically and legally

 

Excerpted from Chapter 2, "Information Literacy Standards for Student Learning," of Information Power: Building Partnerships for Learning. Copyright © 1998 American Library Association and Association for Educational Communications and Technology

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